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Light-filled Interior Snowscapes

Canadian firm Burgers Architecture constructed this mountainside residence from prefabricated volumes.

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Canadian firm Burgers Architecture constructed this mountainside residence from prefabricated volumes so it could be quickly assembled between British Columbia’s snow seasons.
Buckhorn Place is perched on a hilltop and protected by dense trees that envelop the property.

Becoming an architect feels the same as being an artist whose works call for human souls that resemble.

The lot sits in a restrictive view corridor, which dictated the house’s siting close to edge of the street. The building has its back turned to the end of the cul-de-sac, allowing it to make the most of the views of Blackcomb and Whistler peaks from its glazed south facade.

The east and west sides of the three-storey home are clad in black metal and charred red cedar. The floor plates are rotated in relation to one another, creating a private entry corridor. Based in Vancouver, Burgers Architecture designed the house using prefabricated elements and with passive house standards in mind.

“Prefabrication allowed for total precision and control in an environment where snow upwards of two to three metres annually limits construction duration to six months of the year,” said the firm. The roof, walls and floors were shipped to the site fully formed and flat packed, using two trailers, and the house was assembled in just one week.

Photovoltaic panels provide a portion of the electricity, and triple-pane windows with shades help to prevent solar gain. The roofing and north-facing walls are also clad in durable anthracite metal, designed with a slight pitch to shed snow away from the building.

Upon entering is an open-plan kitchen, dining and living area that enjoys the impressive vista through floor-to-ceiling windows, which lead to an outdoor patio. 

Source: dezeen.com

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